Transfer service Interlaken - Zug

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Private transfer from Interlaken to Zug


Private transfer from Interlaken to Zug
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Private transfer service in Interlaken from Limousine Center Switzerland

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Transfer from Interlaken to Zug

Private transfer service from Interlaken.



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Interlaken Interlaken
InterlakenInterlakenInterlakenInterlaken
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Interlaken informations Interlaken
Interlaken is a municipality in the Interlaken-Oberhasli administrative district in the Canton of Bern in Switzerland, a well-known tourist destination in the Bernese Oberland.

Until 1891 Interlaken was known as Aarmühle. The convent of the Augustinian Canons was built around 1133 when it was mentioned as inter lacus Madon and lasted until 1528. The mill on the left bank of the Aare river was first mentioned in 1365 as Amuli, while the town on the right bank was mentioned in 1239 as villa Inderlappen.

Previously, printing, textiles, and to a smaller extent watchmaking were also of importance, but today tourism is the most significant source of income. Interlaken is one of the oldest tourist resorts in Switzerland, and it remains one of the most popular.
Interlaken Weather OnlineInterlaken WikiPediaInterlaken WikiTravelInterlaken TripAdvisorInterlaken WebInterlaken Airport WebHotel InterlakenInterlaken MapInterlaken Pictures
WeatherWikiPediaWikiTravelTripAdvisorWebInterlaken AirportHotelsMapPictures

This article uses briefed material from the Wikipedia article Interlaken, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0, just as this article about the city.

Zug Zug
ZugZugZugZug
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Zug informations Zug
Zug is a German-speaking city in Switzerland. The name "Zug" originates from fishing vocabulary; in the Middle Ages it referred to the right to "pull up" fishing nets and hence to the right to fish.

The city of Zug is located in the Canton of Zug and is its capital. As of 31 December 2011 it had a total population of 26,045 inhabitants.

The town, first mentioned in 1240, was called an "oppidum" in 1242 and a "castrum" in 1255. In 1273, it was bought by Rudolph of Habsburg from Anna, the heiress of Kyburg and wife of Eberhard, head of the cadet line of Habsburg. Part of its territory, the valley of Aegeri, was pledged by Rudolph in 1278 as security for a portion of the marriage gift he promised to Joanna, daughter of Edward I of England. She was betrothed to his son Hartmann, but his death in 1281 prevented the marriage from taking place. The town of Zug was governed by a bailiff, appointed by the Habsburgs, and a council, and was much favored by that family. Several country districts (e.g., Baar, Menzingen, and Aegeri) each had its own "Landsgemeinde" but were governed by one bailiff, also appointed by the Habsburgs; these were known as the "Aeusser Amt," and were always favorably disposed to the Swiss Confederation.
Zug Weather OnlineZug WikiPediaZug WikiTravelZug TripAdvisorZug WebHotel ZugZug MapZug Pictures
Zug WeatherZug WikiPediaZug WikiTravelZug TripAdvisorZug WebZug HotelsZug MapZug Pictures

This article uses briefed material from the Wikipedia article Zug, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0, just as this article about the city.